Thursday, 11 March 2021

Donald Trump tries to pull former NFL player Herschel Walker into Georgia Senate race calling him a 'GREAT person' who'd be 'unstoppable'

 Former President Donald Trump on Wednesday publicly pressured former NFL player Herschel Walker to jump into Georgia's U.S. Senate race. 

The ex-president sent out a Twitter-length statement encouraging Walker, who spoke at last summer's Republican National Convention, to challenge new Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock, who's up for a full six-year term next year. 

'Wouldn't it be fantastic if the legendary Herschel Walker ran for the United States Senate in Georgia?' Trump wrote. 'He would be unstoppable, just like he was when he played for the Georgia Bulldogs, and in the NFL. He is also a GREAT person. Run Herschel, run!' 

Former President Donald Trump
Herschel Walker

Former President Donald Trump (left) is encouraging ex-NFL player and Georgia Bulldog Herschel Walker (right) to jump into the state's U.S. Senate race, as Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock is up for re-election next year 

The former president sent out a Twitter-length statement Wednesday evening telling Walker that he would be 'unstoppable' if he jumped in the race. Republicans were embarrassed in the state three times during the last cycle, with Trump and the two GOP senators losing their races

The former president sent out a Twitter-length statement Wednesday evening telling Walker that he would be 'unstoppable' if he jumped in the race. Republicans were embarrassed in the state three times during the last cycle, with Trump and the two GOP senators losing their races

Since leaving the White House in January, Trump has been trying his hand at Republican Party kingmaking.


This week he had lawyers send cease and desist letters to Republican Party entities, including the Republican National Committee, over using his name and image in party advertising.  

Trump doesn't want the party to give any assistance to 'RINOs' - or those who voted in favor of his impeachment and conviction of the January 6 insurrection. 

In Georgia, a state that saw three major GOP losses - that of Trump and Republican Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler - the ex-president has a particular interest in choosing winners. 

He's also expected to back a primary challenger against Gov. Brian Kemp, who refused to overturn the state's election result, as Georgia's voters picked Democrat Joe Biden. 

Walker was one of Trump's prominent black supporters at this summer's Republican National Convention, which was held after the president leaned into culture war themes - like keeping Confederate names on military bases - in the aftermath of George Floyd's death, which reinvigorated the Black Lives Matter movement.   

Walker agreed with Trump that NFL players shouldn't be kneeling during the playing of the National Anthem, a move to protest racial inequality.  

At a Congressional hearing last month, Walker spoke out against reparations for Americans who are descended from slaves. 

Walker's main argument hinged on how difficult it would be to figure out which Americans qualified. 

'Where would the money from from? Does it come from all the other races except the black taxpayers? Who is black? What percentage of black must you be to receive reparations? Do you go to 23andMe or a DNA test to determine the percentage of blackness?' he asked during the hearing. 


Trump didn't indicate why the sudden enthusiasm for Walker, but his statement comes one day after Politico's Huddle newsletter reported that QAnon Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene didn't rule out a Senate run.  

A number of GOP House members have expressed annoyance publicly at Greene, who will delay votes on legislation - like she did Wednesday on the COVID-19 stimulus - by forcing members to vote down her motion to adjourn. 

In the past, Trump has been supportive of Greene.         

Republicans will ideally want a candidate with name recognition. 

Former Georgia Sen. David Perdue, who lost to Democratic Sen. Jon Ossoff in the January run-offs, has already said he'll sit 2022 out. 

The New York Times reported that Perdue's decision came after a golf game with Trump. 

Former Sen. Kelly Loeffler, who had been appointed by Kemp and lost to Warnock, could also run again, as could Rep. Doug Collins, a Trump ally who primaried Loeffler, which likely helped contribute to her loss to a Democrat. 

Collins, too, could jump in the race, but Trump publicly encouraged him to mount a primary challenge against Kemp, who's up for re-election next year.   

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