Thursday, 25 March 2021

Father of Boulder cop, 51, who was killed in supermarket massacre says his son was a Second Amendment advocate who owned an AR-15 and would be 'deeply offended' if his death promoted gun control

 The father of the police officer who was shot dead this week in the Colorado supermarket massacre has said his son was a Second Amendment advocate who would not want his death used to promote for gun control.

Boulder police officer Eric Talley, 51, was killed Monday after responding to the scene of the King Soopers massacre, which also saw nine others shot dead.

But his father Homer Talley says his son was a gun enthusiast, who even owned an AR-15 rifle - which is similar to the Ruger AR-556 used in the massacre. 


'My son would have been deeply offended to know his death would be used to promote gun control. Before he was an officer, he enjoyed shooting,' Homer told TMZ.

Talley says his son was a strong supporter of the second amendment and often used his AR-15 rifle for target practice. 

Officer Talley was one of the first to respond to the scene at King Soopers, where gunman Ahmad Alissa, 21, opened fire killing two people in the supermarket's parking lot and eight more inside before being apprehended by police. 

Homer Talley, father of slain Boulder cop, Eric Talley, says 'My son would have been deeply offended to know his death would be used to promote gun control. Before he was an officer, he enjoyed shooting,'

Homer Talley, father of slain Boulder cop, Eric Talley, says 'My son would have been deeply offended to know his death would be used to promote gun control. Before he was an officer, he enjoyed shooting,'

Slain Boulder Police officer Eric Talley, 51, was one of the first to respond to the scene of the King Soopers, where gunman Ahmad Alissa, 21, opened fire killing 10 people

Slain Boulder Police officer Eric Talley, 51, was one of the first to respond to the scene of the King Soopers, where gunman Ahmad Alissa, 21, opened fire killing 10 people

The mass shooting, which came a few days after a gunman massacred eight women at an Asian spa in Atlanta, Georgia, has led to calls from Washington to enact stricter gun control, but Eric's father says that he does not believe any gun reform laws could have protected his son. 

Homer called Monday's massacre 'a senseless act and that is just it. The situation [Eric] found himself in wasn't one that the government could protect him from.' 

He added, 'Just because some wacko goes around shooting people doesn't mean guns need to be taken away. You can't take away enough guns to protect this country.' 

Alissa made his first court appearance on Thursday and faces ten counts of murder

Alissa made his first court appearance on Thursday and faces ten counts of murder

Shooter Alissa made his first court appearance on Thursday and faces ten counts of murder. 

His attorneys asked for three months to determine his mental health and whether or not he should stand trial. The prosecution asked for it to happen sooner and said they expect to file more charges next week once the crime scene is processed.  

Alissa spoke briefly to say that he understood the charges.

His attorney then said: 'We cannot do anything until we're able to fully assess Mr Alissa's mental illness and we cannot do that until we have the discovery from the government.' 

 

No plea was entered and he will continue to be held without bond.   

He has been described by family as a 'loser' who 'never had a girlfriend' but has had temper problems for much of his life. 

He is yet to explain what motivated him to carry out the attack at the King Soopers store in Boulder, about 28 miles northwest of Denver

When police surrounded the store on Monday about 20 minutes after he started killing, he took off his clothes and surrendered, then asked to speak to his mother. 

Alissa was using a Rugers AR-556 which is a style of shortened assault rifle. He bought it a week before the massacre on March 16. 

Alissa had ranted on social media about Islamophobes hacking his phone and complained about President Donald Trump's immigration policies.   

Police charged Alissa with ten counts of murder
Talley is survived by his his wife and their seven children. Their youngest child is seven years old

Police charged Ahmad Alissa, 21, with ten counts of murder after allegedly using a semi-automatic rifle to gun down 10 people at a King Soopers store in Boulder, Colorado

Authorities have not yet confirmed alleged gunman Ahmad Alissa, 21, motive for the massacre

Authorities have not yet confirmed alleged gunman Ahmad Alissa, 21, motive for the massacre

The mass shooting in Boulder, Colorado came a few days after a gunman massacred 8 women in Atlanta, Georgia

The mass shooting in Boulder, Colorado came a few days after a gunman massacred 8 women in Atlanta, Georgia

Officer Talley, who had a master's degree, left a six-figure job working as an IT technician to join law enforcement after his friend tragically died in a DUI crash

Officer Talley, who had a master's degree, left a six-figure job working as an IT technician to join law enforcement after his friend tragically died in a DUI crash


Talley had been working as an officer for just over a decade after enrolling in the Aurora's Police Training Academy when he was 40 years old. 

Talley, who had a master's degree, left a six-figure job working as an IT technician to join law enforcement after his friend tragically died in a DUI crash. 

But after a decade on the force, Talley's father said the slain officer had been learning to become a drone operator so he could step away from the front line.

'He didn't want to put his family through something like this,' his father said.

Talley is survived by his his wife and their seven children. Their youngest child is seven years old.

'He loved his kids and his family more than anything,' his father said.

Boulder Police Chief Maris Herold paid tribute to Talley on Tuesday, acknowledging that he became a police officer because he realized he had a 'higher calling'.

'He was a very kind man who didn't have to go into policing. He had a profession before this. He had a higher calling,' an emotional Herold said.

'He's everything policing needs and deserves. He was willing to die to protect others.' 

'He was a very kind man who didn't have to go into policing. He had a profession before this. He had a higher calling,' Boulder Police Chief Maris Herold said.

'He was a very kind man who didn't have to go into policing. He had a profession before this. He had a higher calling,' Boulder Police Chief Maris Herold said. 

President Joe Biden renewed his call for an assault weapons and high-capacity magazine ban in the aftermath of double massacres in Atlanta, Georgia and Boulder, Colorado

President Joe Biden renewed his call for an assault weapons and high-capacity magazine ban in the aftermath of double massacres in Atlanta, Georgia and Boulder, Colorado

President Joe Biden also commended officer Talley for his 'exceptional bravery.' 

'When the moment to act came Officer Talley did not hesitate in his duty making the ultimate sacrifice in his effort to save lives. That's the definition of an American hero,' Biden said following the shooting. 

Earlier this week President Biden said he was open to using executive action to enact stricter gun control. 

He also renewed his call for a ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines in the aftermath of the double massacres in Atlanta and Boulder.

'We can ban assault weapons and high-capacity magazines in this country once again,' he said, encouraging lawmakers to act. 'This should not be a partisan issue. It's an American issue. It will save lives. American lives. We have to act.'

But Talley says while he supports 'common-sense gun laws' he and his son would never support legislation that bans guns. 

'To take away that freedom completely is something I am against and my son was against. Of course, therein lies the debate ... what is 'common sense' when it comes to guns?' 

Talley adds he is letting go of any anger towards the gunman for allegedly killing his son. 

'My family and my son are people of faith, we understand forgiveness and that is necessary for not just the shooter, but for ourselves.' he said. 

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